找到

"froggy plays in the band翻译"

相关内容

For all parents these days, questions about technology arise constantly. How do we help our kids keep their technology use in check, and more importantly, how do we support them as they’re learning to find a good balance for themselves in all aspects of life? 

Brain research tells us that the prefrontal cortex, the area of the brain that regulates decision-making and impulse control, is not fully formed until the early twenties. If we, as grown adults with fully formed brains, have a difficult time staying on task with all of these distractions, imagine how difficult it is for the kids! 

Our students, especially once they get to high school, are extremely driven and capable. While they might not always agree with the work they’ve been assigned, they understand its importance and will most likely get it done. So when they get distracted by their favorite video games, websites, social networking platforms, and various other technologies, what ends up getting neglected to compensate for the lost time? 

For many of our students, it seems that sleep, face-to-face interaction, and physical activity often get pushed to the back burner. 
  
Balance and boundaries 
So how do we help them find balance among all these important activities? Our reactionary reflex is often to take something away from our kids when they’re not handling it well, but that’s just not possible when it comes to technology. Technology is too embedded in our lives, and is obviously a key component of education nowadays. But, just as we equip our students with nutritional education so they can make their own food choices, we need to educate them on how to manage their media diet. We have to teach our kids to navigate technology and the Internet in the same way that we teach them to navigate the outside world. 

When kids are young, we don’t let them spend too much time outside by themselves. We stay with them, or we tell them to stay within the confines of the lawn so we can keep an eye on them. As they get a little bit older, we expand the boundaries a bit, letting them go down the street, but not outside the compound or the neighborhood. Slowly, those boundaries expand, encompassing not just the compound, but the city as a whole. By the time they’re in high school, they have hopefully earned our trust, and with that trust, more freedom. 

But regardless of the child or the level of trust, we still have boundaries. They should know that if they go out and don’t make it back by the agreed upon time, they lose a bit of that trust, and a little bit of that freedom. A lesson is learned, and the next time they go out, they know to make it home on time. 
  
We need teach our kids to balance their technology use in the same way. Developmentally appropriate guidelines need to be put in place, and as trust is earned, more freedom should be granted. 

When children are small, we should be there with them as they’re navigating the Internet. Dr. Larry Rosen, technology blogger for Psychology Today, calls this concept “co-viewing” and suggests it as a tool to open up the lines of communication. As parents and teachers, we should be there to talk to the kids about the information they’re receiving, answering questions as we guide them towards locating reliable sources on their own. They should be granted free time, but just as if they were playing outside, we should keep a watchful eye and have time limits in place. 

As children approach adolescence, the need for freedom is greater, and one of the biggest factors in keeping our kids out of trouble is their perception of how much their parents trust them. When children feel like they have the trust of their parents, they’re more likely to act with integrity and make the right choices, even when nobody’s watching. However, as adolescence is the time when most dependency issues around Internet and video games will begin to develop, they still need our guidance. While a child’s need for freedom and privacy is becoming greater, so is their need for firmly placed boundaries. 

I suggest working collaboratively with your children to draft a contract that will establish some technology guidelines. Here are some suggestions. 
  
1.Agree on a “tech curfew” 
A recent study by the National Sleep Foundation finds that the average teen is getting less than seven hours per night, compared to the recommended nine hours needed for proper brain development. Just as we wouldn’t let our kids stay out every night until 1:00 or 2:00 a.m., we shouldn’t be letting them stay up too late with their technology. Agreeing upon a “tech curfew,” and treating it like a regular curfew, will ensure that whether or not homework is completed, there is a time that the computer gets shut down. This time should be negotiated based on age, developmental cues, and trust. 

We often hear the kids joking that if they sleep too much, they will fall behind in school, but nothing could be further from the truth. We can’t ignore the importance of sleep and the essential role it plays in physical and mental development. Kids need sleep, and they also need help in regulating behavior and developing self-control.  
  
2. Help students recognize their “tech distractions” 
Give them time to explore their passions and hobbies — yes, even video games — but encourage them to recognize where their distractions lie and help them to come up with some solutions on how to manage their time wisely. 

All of the stress relievers that we enjoyed at their age — listening to music, chatting with friends, reading, playing games — are now just a click away. At any given time, they can find someone to interact with who shares their interests. While that’s all very exciting, it can also be very tempting. Keep the communication lines open. By letting them know that you support all of their interests, they will be more likely to come to you if they need some help in balancing them. 
  
3. Insist on “breaks and breathers”  
Whether it’s to have a chat, go for a walk, or play outside, we all need breaks. One type of break that can keep communication lines open and establish trust is the family meal. Research shows that this has a positive impact on the emotional and physical health of children, teens, and their parents. Insist that everyone put their technology aside and come to the table to eat together and engage in discussions. 

But the concept of the break works both ways. With teenagers, Dr. Rosen suggests taking “technology breaks” as a way to manage distractions and regulate self-control. He suggests that parents use this at the dinner table, allowing everyone to check in with their phones or technology for a minute or two after 15 minutes of focus time. He has found that this can be useful in getting everyone to remain engaged with the people in front of them, rather than constantly focusing on what they might be missing out on in their digital worlds. 

Navigating this new terrain can be tricky, and as parents, the most important thing to remember is that all of the parenting tools you’ve learned and used throughout the years still apply in the digital world. Responsibility and character are developed through experience and time. Communication is key, and trust should be a two-way street. Our kids need our support, and they also need freedom to grow. 

Let them play, let them chat, and let them learn, but also let them know when it’s time to shut it down and take a break. 
  

Resources on parenting and educating in the digital age: 
www.commonsensemedia.org 
www.parentfurther.com/technology-media. 
www.pluggedin.com/ 
www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/digitalnation/resources/ 

 By Amy Smith, Middle School health teacher, Puxi campus


相关推荐

小花生网公众号
关注小花生网公众号
百万订阅、精华推荐
小花生App
下载小花生App
阅读打卡、经验分享